JUDITH BUTLER ° Where are We Now? Assembly, Care, and Connection

presumed access to shared space.  And yet, there have been ways to occupy public space that accept the safety protocols for Covid-19.  How then do we think about “safety” in relation to assembly? We speak about the right of peaceable assembly, but do we speak as often about safe conditions for assembly?  The idea of safety brings up ambivalent viewpoints, and it became a key topic of debate for the Occupy movement and for the uprisings of the Arab Spring. “To play it safe” means not taking risks, not asking for too much, so what role, if any, does danger now play? If we think that heroic forms of risking our lives is part of a political struggle, what happens when the risk that I take is immediately a risk to you as well?  Where does an ethics of care enter into our politics of assembly?

Claudia Bosse "Die Perser" © Christian Bort

CLAUDIA BOSSE ° Assemble in Choirs

Choir is also a gathering of different interests that approach each other over a period of time, negotiating their differences, experiences and understandings.
Sharing, articulating. not always with words, but with actions in a physical articulation in space, space-grasping.
A connection to others, previously unfamiliar, is created.
Society and play at the same time.

Public Movement "Spring in Warsaw" (2009) © Tomasz Pastenak

DANA YAHALOMI ° Body Next to Body. The Practice of Being Together

To assemble is first and foremost a physical act of being present body next to body. Dana Yahalomi elaborates on the sociopolitical potential and the responsibility of the arts and artists to facilitate arenas where people can rehearse the corporal and behavioral knowledge assembly requires. Starting with the historic Operation Stockholm (1961), she unfolds a chronicle of choreographies from a civic perspective.