The Chruch of Stop Shopping © Savitri D

IV: Choirs of Precarity & Power (Claudia Bosse, The Church of Stop Shopping, Alia Mossallam & Florian Malzacher)

Choirs are a very specific form of assembling – from representing “the people” in Greek tragedy via all kinds of religious choirs, political choirs, revolutionary choirs up to the legendary human mic at Occupy Wall Street and the iconic chants at Tahrir Square in 2011. Theatre director Claudia Bosse, art theorist Alia Mossallam, and the activists of The Church of Stop Shopping discuss the potential (and perhaps dangers), the tenderness, the precarity and the power of synchronised singing, chanting, shouting along concrete artistic and activistic practices in Cairo, New York and Vienna.

ALIA MOSSALLAM ° To Chant the Worlds Away. The Anatomy of the 2011 Revolution

‘unshaken’. It was one of the newer chants that were infused into us on the 25th of January 2011 – every time the police launched an offensive, and people started to run, someone would shout “Ithabt” as he or she stopped moving, and then several would shout it, and then tens and hundreds, until thousands would stop. I would close my ears and squeeze my eyes shut and let the thousands of voices shake through me, shake out the fear, and stabilise my resolve.

Public Movement "Spring in Warsaw" (2009) © Tomasz Pastenak

I: Assembly as Preenactment (Oliver Marchart, Dana Yahalomi & Florian Malzacher)

„Preenactment“ is a term used by choreographer and artist Dana Yahalomi / Public Movement (Tel Aviv) as well as by political theorist Oliver Marchart (Wien) to describe the artistic anticipation of political events to come. So, how can political or artistic assemblies become rehearsals or trainings for an unpredictable future? Recorded on January 23rd 2021

Public Movement "Spring in Warsaw" (2009) © Tomasz Pastenak

DANA YAHALOMI ° Body Next to Body. The Practice of Being Together

To assemble is first and foremost a physical act of being present body next to body. Dana Yahalomi elaborates on the sociopolitical potential and the responsibility of the arts and artists to facilitate arenas where people can rehearse the corporal and behavioral knowledge assembly requires. Starting with the historic Operation Stockholm (1961), she unfolds a chronicle of choreographies from a civic perspective.