Didier Eribon ° How and When Can We Say “We”? A Few Remarks on Social Protest and Political Dissent

Didier Eribon is a French sociologist and philosopher. He was professor of sociology in Amiens and visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley, at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, at the universities of Harvard and Yale, at New York University (NYU) and at Columbia University. His socio-autobiography Return to Reims (2009) in which he reveals the break-up of French society attracted international attention. His work Insult and theMaking of the Gay Self (1999) has become a classic and a founding document of Queer Studies. Among his most recent publications are La société comme verdict(2013) and Principes d’une pensée critique (2016).

Alia Mossallam ° To Chant the Worlds Away. The Anatomy of the 2011 Revolution

‘unshaken’. It was one of the newer chants that were infused into us on the 25th of January 2011 – every time the police launched an offensive, and people started to run, someone would shout “Ithabt” as he or she stopped moving, and then several would shout it, and then tens and hundreds, until thousands would stop. I would close my ears and squeeze my eyes shut and let the thousands of voices shake through me, shake out the fear, and stabilise my resolve.

Oliver Ressler "Take the Square" (2012) Filmstill

Oliver Ressler ° Voices to Reckon with

Assemblies provide a crucial platform for direct decision-making in any attempt to make societies more inclusive and democratic, more just and less hierarchical than those existing today. For a long time now, assemblies have also played a central role in Oliver Ressler’s films and video installations. Together with Dario Azzellini, he produced a cycle of films on factories under workers’ control in Europe. Before that he filmed the Square and Occupy movements in Athens, Madrid and New York. His latest film shows a four-hour assembly in Madrid in October 2019, where delegates from various environmental groups gathered to prepare an act of civil disobedience to foster climate rebellion.

Public Movement "Spring in Warsaw" (2009) © Tomasz Pastenak

Dana Yahalomi ° Body Next to Body. The Practice of Being Together

To assemble is first and foremost a physical act of being present body next to body. Dana Yahalomi elaborates on the sociopolitical potential and the responsibility of the arts and artists to facilitate arenas where people can rehearse the corporal and behavioral knowledge assembly requires. Starting with the historic Operation Stockholm (1961), she unfolds a chronicle of choreographies from a civic perspective.